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The Problem of Non-User IDs in Organizations Today

February 4th, 2016 | No Comments | Posted in General Idm/IAM, IdM Engagement

identities(The contents of this article are captured here and reflected back in response to an article posted on SailPoint’s Identity Quotient Blog article entitled “Third-Party Contractors: The Target Breach’s Bulls-eye.” I recommend reading that article to establish context for this article.)

It is fairly well known and pretty much public knowledge that the Target breach took place leveraging 3rd party credentials that were phished from an associated Heating Venting and Air Conditioning (HVAC) vendor.  This was the initial point of entry into the Target network.

However, the HVAC credentials were primarily leveraged only for initial access. Credit card data was not being accessed and syphoned using that specific HVAC ID. Nevertheless, controls around time of access and other metadata information that could be policy driven within SailPoint IdentityIQ around that 3rd party access are still cogent to the discussion as per the aforementioned SailPoint article.

What isn’t mentioned in the article is that SailPoint IdentityIQ and ideally any IdM product could and should have a very big part to play in the gathering of and providing governance around Non-User IDs (NUIDs) — testing IDs, training IDs, B2B FTP IDs, generic admin IDs (that should be privileged access managed anyway), application IDs (huge!), etc.

Organizations typically have thousands, tens of thousands and yes, even millions of orphaned and ungoverned NUIDs, in terms of overall access, proliferated, orphaned and laying dormant on end-point servers and systems…

To an attacker, an ID is an ID is an ID. Any ID will suffice in order to establish a beachhead on a system and then begin trying to “walk” systems, ideally though the elevation of access. This is typically how deep penetration and spanning of internal networks has taken place in a lot of recent breaches. When attacking a system and attempting to establish access, it doesn’t matter to the attacker whether the initial ID used is technically a normal and established user ID (with or without governance around it) or a NUID that typically is not being properly tracked and governed within organizations. In fact, NUIDs represent an ideal target due to the fact they don’t have visibility and normal and established governance around them in many organizations.
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Stupid SailPoint Developer Tricks

Hello, mates — as they say Down Under, where I happen to be at the moment on a rather large Sailpoint engagement. It’s been a while, and I’m sorry for that. I keep promising more, new and better content and haven’t delivered.

The last couple of months however have been absolutely crazy and there have been some changes on my end, as you perhaps can see. Now that things have shaped up a bit, maybe I can get back to the business at hand here on the blog, again as I have time.

Stupid Pet Tricks

When I was growing up and in college, a famous comedian became famous (partially) by having a segment on his show called “Stupid Pet Tricks.” Some were hilarious and some… belonged on the 1980’s “Gong Show.” (If you’ve never heard of “The Gong Show,” trust me, you aren’t missing anything).

Since that time, I’ve always thought of various developer tricks in the same light. Some are quite slick and useful and some… really just need to be buried. I’ll leave it to you to decide on this one.

Out of sheer laziness, while onboarding Sailpoint applications that feature a BuildMap rule (eg. BuildMap, JDBCBuildMap, and SAPBuildMap), I sometimes utilize a method for “printing debug statements” that I can see directly and immediately in connectorDebug, without having to jump into or tail the Sailpoint IIQ log or application server logs.

It’s also just a bit less verbose as the Sailpoint IIQ logs typically have a large class identification prefix in front of them, which can get rather cumbersome and make it more difficult to pick out one’s intended debug output.

Plus I hate changing logging levels in log4j.properties even though the Sailpoint IIQ debug page allows me to load a new logging configuration dynamically. In short, I’m just a lazy, complaining type when it comes to Sailpoint IIQ debug statements.

Someone mentioned this would be worth blogging about, so here goes. (At the very least, this is an easy article to write and perhaps will get me back into the blogging swing?!)

__DEBUG__ Schema

Now, I would definitely recommend doing this only on a local or designated sandbox and then making sure you clean up before checking in your code. (You are using some form of source code control for your Sailpoint IIQ development, aren’t you?!)
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SailPoint IIQ: Aggregating XML

From an answer to a client this morning on aggregating XML in Sailpoint IIQ. I hope this helps others out there:

Regarding your question this morning on aggregating XML… I have seen XML aggregated through the OOTB RuleBasedFileParser connector. That connector requires that a rule be written to run the parser and through that, you could parse and aggregate XML. I mentioned this to one of our Solution Architects after our meeting and he was aware of the RuleBasedFileParser type, but personally felt it was enough work such that you may as well write a custom connector using libraries Java has available to handle XML.

I think between him and me, I would say the following:

(1) From an overall perspective, it’s technically possible using the RuleBasedFileParser connector to aggregate XML.

(2) There may need to be a discussion about the XML in consideration itself to determine the level of complexity of XML coming in, in which case:
(a)…The RuleBasedFileParser may be an adequate choice.
(b)…A custom connector for the XML may be in order.

One other approach could be:

(i) Use a DelimitedFile connector.
(ii) Write a pre-iterate rule leveraging the Java XML classes available to (a) read the XML and (b) create a CSV from the XML for the DelimitedFile connector to consume.
(iii) Use the post-iterate rule to clean up.

As you can see, there is more than one way to skin the XML cat here. This is the case as with most things in Sailpoint IIQ, as I demonstrate in at least one blog post, can be “tricked” in various places into doing what it is you ultimately want it to do.

As with any of this, it’s very common to have to sit down on an engagement and triage between a number of approach options to decide on the best implementation approach. I hope this information helps you with that process.

From the Twin Cities, where we shrug off the second day of Spring with a second helping of Winter, Amigos…

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SailPoint IIQ Security Best Practices

October 15th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted in IAM Development, IAM Engagement, IdM Engagement

Over the last several weeks I’ve been building out an entire Sailpoint IIQ development infrastructure on ESXi — every major version of Sailpoint IIQ since v5.2 on CentOS 6 (essentially RHEL 6), available over a number of major app server platforms for customer and development testing (eg. Tomcat, JBoss, perhaps WebLogic, etc.), including Windows Server 2K8 Active Directory, LDAP and other outlying systems. Today, as I considered the small data center I’ve been building out, I had “on-site flashbacks,” and I thought it would be a good time to talk about Sailpoint IIQ security best practices.

Easy To Forget!

We all get busy and it’s easy to forget — we’re supposed to be security professionals. A lot of you out there have a couple of forensics cases waiting in the wings, there’s that big virus scare Bob in Accounting let loose on the network on “Bring Your Son To Work Day” (yep, he plugged his son’s laptop into the network, didn’t he?! :-(), there’s the perimeter pen testing you and Jane are supposed to be doing on the 15 new apps destined this week for external rollout, there’s the latest audit report due (again!), and… oh yeah, there are these SailPoint consultants on-site the next two weeks helping you __________ your (new) IdM infrastructure, starting in dev (fill in the blank with “rollout”, “upgrade”, “assess”, “shakeout”, “test”, “customize”, or “all of the above” as it suits.)

As you may have noticed with barely concealed glee, Sailpoint IIQ is your new magnifying glass for IAG in the enterprise; it’s really good about going after the details at a minimum (based on RO connections to all your outlying systems), to say nothing of what you may be doing for certifications, reporting, provisioning and workflows — full LCM (if you’re on your way to IAG nirvana!) You’re going to nail non-compliance with this tool.

But what about the tool itself!? Have you stopped to consider the following best practices around secure Sailpoint IIQ deployment? It doesn’t do anything to fully amorize the front of the barn if other individuals in your enterprise can sneak in the back door!

What is your “threat footprint” for Sailpoint IIQ as “an enterprise application” itself?! (That’s the funny thing about Sailpoint IIQ — it audits apps, but it’s an app itself, when you think about it.) I’m not going to say a WORD about what I’ve seen anyone do. :-) Just make sure you are doing the following at some point when you’ve got Bob in Accounting up to sped on network policy and at least one of those audit reports done before your CISO has that meeting with HIS boss, the CEO. :-)
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Sean O’Neill on OIA versus OIM

March 2nd, 2012 | No Comments | Posted in IAM Engagement, IdM Engagement, Vendor Specific

I was looking into an Oracle Identity Analytics discussion group on LinkedIn the other day and there was a friendly “back and forth” going on between Oracle Identity Analytics features versus Oracle Identity Manager features crossover.  I wanted to highlight the discussion here, specifically with Sean O’Neill‘s response because he really nailed it.

The backdrop, which I will provide here, is something clients ask often for Oracle IdM implementations because there does seem to be some cross functionality between Oracle Waveset and OIM for provisioning, certifications and attestations, as well as some role management, versus OIA for role management, certifications and attestations and overall identity warehousing.

“Oracle Waveset and/or Oracle Identity Manager have similar functionality to Oracle Identity Analytics, so which should I use?”

This is a common question amongst clients as well as implementers.  If you are a client and you see even implementers are divided on when to use which feature in which product, it can get a bit confusing if not unsettling.  The real answer, before I get to Sean’s response, is somewhat three-fold:

  1. (1) The dilemma stems from the fact these were all products derived from different sources and product roadmaps from other companies, and so there simply is crossover in features and functionality.  So the confusion is understandable, even amongst implementers.  In some cases, either answer (“go with OIM“, “no, use OIA for ______”) is “right” and may stem more from an implementer’s comfort level in implementation than anything else.
  2. (2) It’s best, when utilizing these products in conjunction (eg. Oracle Waveset with OIA or OIM with OIA) to settle on the proper division of functionality during the design phase of your IdM project, while keeping mind…
  3. (3) Oracle’s roadmap for both products in the new Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g line.

This will help “settle” the questions during implementation and provide for a more seamless transition to the Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g product line and conformance to that roadmap.

So, when choosing a vendor to implement the Oracle stack, make sure you choose one that understands the Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g product roadmap as well as the specifics of an Oracle technical implementation.  For OIM, you really need technical expertise, as there are many more moving parts for an OIM implementation.  (What a shame that Oracle Waveset was kicked to the curb, but it’s history now, so no sense lamenting it any longer.  A natural product progression for Oracle Waveset users exists in Sailpoint IIQ IMO. :-))  But make sure, when you are RFP’ing for what you know will likely be an Oracle implementation, that you bring on a vendor who thoroughly understands the Oracle roadmap and, preferably, has ties to internal Oracle IdM resources. :-)

Sean’s Response to OIM Functionality versus OIA

Now, for Sean’s clarification on “which to use,” which was the backdrop of the discussion on LinkedIn, I’ll just quote most of Sean’s response:

OIM can do many of the same functions (though not as richly) such as role management, attestations, etc. as OIA, but it can only do it for systems that are connected to OIM. In order for OIM to work with a target resource, it has to be connected to the resource. 

This means using a connector to access the resources user API’s, which introduces cost and effort. This means not all systems in the enterprise will get hooked up.

As most companies do not provision to 100% of their systems, it means they are working with a subset of user entitlement information. OIM is mainly a provisioning platform, using a BPEL based workflow engine to manage accounts across connected systems. (Yes, you can have stubbed, manually maintained resources using emails or flat files to dictate what an admin should change in the user accounts, but that complicates this discussion.)
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Quick Guide to Rebranding SailPoint IIQ

January 18th, 2012 | No Comments | Posted in IdM Engagement, Vendor Specific

So you’ve got Sailpoint IIQ all installed and humming on your enterprise servers, and your boss walks in and says “My boss says the CIO wants this rebranded for better internal look and feel, to keep confusion down for identity self-service requests. Can you have it done by Monday?!”

Your answer, even if it’s Friday, should be “Yes, sir!!” Here’s how you can do it, covering just the basics. In this exercise, we’ll cover rebranding:

  • The login banner page
  • The IIQ headers on each page, and…
  • The overall CSS colors on each page providing the final L&F

Let’s get started.

Overview

The tools and “skillz” you will need (as they say) will actually lean more on the graphics side than on the Java or HTML development side for this exercise. In fact, other than careful and proper placement of the resulting graphics files inside your deployed application and application server file system, graphical capabilities and understanding of CSS are going to be your primary concerns. If you are not very good at handling a graphical editor like Adobe Photoshop or GIMP, now’s the time to call your friend, Sally, over in Marketing to lend you a hand.

Assuming you know where Sailpoint IIQ is “rooted” on your application server, we’re going to graphically reconstitute a few files. We’ll assume a Tomcat installation here, which should carry over quite nicely for a JBoss AS installation as well. WebSphere, Glassfish, WebLogic and you other app server flavored peeps out there, try to follow along.

For Tomcat, assuming an installed/deployed path of /srv/tomcat6/webapps, you should/would have /srv/tomcat6/webapps/identityiq for your application root. So then, we’re going to graphically reconstitute:

  • $APP_ROOT/images/login.gif
  • All the header*.gif files in $APP_ROOT/images and…
  • identityIIQ-logo.gif

Furthermore, we’re going to, at a bare minimum, twiddle the background-color CSS attribute on five (5) CSS files. We’ll detail all that when we get to the section on CSS.
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IdM Demand In 4th Quarter Kills Blogging (and everything else)!

What kind of blogger would I be if there weren’t blatantly long periods of time where I’m not blogging?! There are a lot of people, especially in IT, who commit to blogging who, get off to a good start, and then taper off to nothing. I’m in danger of being such a person, but I’m aiming to change that here soon.

It’s just been the busiest 4th quarter (and especially December) I’ve ever had in my entire 20+ year career. Business and demand in the Identity Management space is just booming, and there have been more concurrent end-of-year projects (of any sort) than I can ever remember. Qubera gigs at a major software house, a major US investment firm and a leading California educational institution have had me absolutely hopping. 2012 is quite frankly looking ominous and scary. Identity Management is in high demand and with new, innovative products like Sailpoint IIQ v5.5 out in the 4th quarter and more IdM product movement in the magic quadrant, the demand is high in the industry right now.

That being said, here’s what’s coming up, and not necessarily in this order:

  • Branding Your SailPoint IIQ Site – If you’ve got your eyes on Sailpoint IIQ or already have it in house and want/need to rebrand your site for internal L&F purposes, I’ll lead you through how to do it. It’s quite simple actually.
  • It’s Time To Change Travel Regulations around electronics – Recently I’ve read a number of articles on just how far behind the FAA is on the (non-existant) “dangers of electronic devices on airplanes.” As a consultant who does a fair amount of travel (not a ton, but enough), I have some thoughts on this. It’s definitely time for some changes.
  • Managing Your Vendor Relationships – I recently read a great article from Gigaom on some of the big-time vendors which happen to operate (most of them) in the Identity Management space. The article brought up some great points and as a Solutions Architect and Technical Engagement Manager who has to advise clients on these relationships, I had a few insights and comments to make which may be helpful.
  • iPhone versus Android Comparison – I recently had the opportunity, thanks to purchasing a new iPhone 4S for a family member, to side by side compare the iPhone with an upper-end Android device, the HTC EVO 4G which I carry. Hint: There is no comparison. I was truly blown away. I’ll let you know which device wins as I throw my lot into the “smart phone wars.”

I’m going to whip out that FAA airline article now, but stay tuned for more.

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