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Stupid SailPoint Developer Tricks

Hello, mates — as they say Down Under, where I happen to be at the moment on a rather large Sailpoint engagement. It’s been a while, and I’m sorry for that. I keep promising more, new and better content and haven’t delivered.

The last couple of months however have been absolutely crazy and there have been some changes on my end, as you perhaps can see. Now that things have shaped up a bit, maybe I can get back to the business at hand here on the blog, again as I have time.

Stupid Pet Tricks

When I was growing up and in college, a famous comedian became famous (partially) by having a segment on his show called “Stupid Pet Tricks.” Some were hilarious and some… belonged on the 1980’s “Gong Show.” (If you’ve never heard of “The Gong Show,” trust me, you aren’t missing anything).

Since that time, I’ve always thought of various developer tricks in the same light. Some are quite slick and useful and some… really just need to be buried. I’ll leave it to you to decide on this one.

Out of sheer laziness, while onboarding Sailpoint applications that feature a BuildMap rule (eg. BuildMap, JDBCBuildMap, and SAPBuildMap), I sometimes utilize a method for “printing debug statements” that I can see directly and immediately in connectorDebug, without having to jump into or tail the Sailpoint IIQ log or application server logs.

It’s also just a bit less verbose as the Sailpoint IIQ logs typically have a large class identification prefix in front of them, which can get rather cumbersome and make it more difficult to pick out one’s intended debug output.

Plus I hate changing logging levels in log4j.properties even though the Sailpoint IIQ debug page allows me to load a new logging configuration dynamically. In short, I’m just a lazy, complaining type when it comes to Sailpoint IIQ debug statements.

Someone mentioned this would be worth blogging about, so here goes. (At the very least, this is an easy article to write and perhaps will get me back into the blogging swing?!)

__DEBUG__ Schema

Now, I would definitely recommend doing this only on a local or designated sandbox and then making sure you clean up before checking in your code. (You are using some form of source code control for your Sailpoint IIQ development, aren’t you?!)
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