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iPad Remote App Uses HTTP

October 25th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted in Moble, Networking

I’ve only recently gotten around to getting any semblance of order and imported CDs into my iTunes on my Macbook Pro. No need to run Apple‘s iPad Remote until now. I usually just use Teleport (highly recommended by the way) to move my mouse onto my wife’s Mac Mini screen which has some nice Bose speakers and play tunes through her computer anyway from our centralized MP3 share on the household file server.

But anyway, this afternoon I was trying to connect to my iTunes library using Remote and wasn’t getting anywhere. Apple has a link built into Remote that takes you to a page on Safari in their support forums that has detailed help on how to trouble-shoot Remote connectivity issues, but everything on my Macbook Pro and iPad 2 seemed to be setup just fine.

I got the notion however that Remote might be using HTTP to access shared iTunes libraries on the local LAN. Sure enough. And that did the trick. We’re using a proxy server on the premises and apparently my entries in iPad networking for ignoring proxy requests for .local domains isn’t working. (It’s time to get away from .local anyway… this is being utilized more and more behind the scenes — I’ve been warned.)

So if you’re having issues with iTunes home sharing in any way and you’re behind a proxy server, this could be the source of your grief. Try turning your proxy server settings off and see what happens.

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iOS 5 Update Review

October 14th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted in Moble

So, a quick review of my twin iOS 5 upgrade. I have two iPad 2 devices. One for me, consulting (just invaluable for reading!), and one for the wife, homemaking. Which of the two is more “business critical”? :-) I’m not saying outright but let’s just say, I’m the CEO and she’s the COO at home. Everything starts at home, and she runs a tight ship, so… I’ll let you go figure from there. :-)

My CEO Upgrade

My upgrade may be of some interest because… for sake of simplicity, when I originally bought my iPad 2, I didn’t yet have a Mac. I still had a company owned PC and I didn’t want to sync to that. So I sync’d to her Mac with her id. Maybe a bad decision at the time, with the completely inexplicable need to have the original iPad 2 even have to plug in to get started in the first place, but that drove that decision. (We were completely taken back and absolutely amazed at the time that Apple actually made you plug in a cable to wake up a mobile device — to this day, that still amazes me, and then later the belated capability was touted as a “check this out” feature by Apple when talking about iOS 5… Really?! :-))

So I decided for the iOS 5 upgrade, I would get back on my own Apple ID. I half expected my backup to backup all the apps “we” had bought and restore them to my iPad 2 and still be maintained. I was 50/50 on this. Ehhht. No dice. So I have to buy my own copy of Pages and whatnot. But… The upgrade did retain all my settings for apps like Mint.com, Box.net, Dropbox, etc. (Hey Mint!! When are you going to get with the program and release your iPad 2 application!!?? C’mon!! Way overdue!!)

Needless to say, my Cydia jailbreak was going to be toast. But I was prepared to live with that. The biggest asset for having a rooted device previously was extending the number of sites I could have open at one time in Safari and the geek factor of being able to SSH into the iPad 2 from a command line on my Mac. And some Springboard modifications and features, but… No big deal losing on any of those fronts and the new iOS 5 Safari was going to fix that, so… we’ll see what happens with Cydia comes out with a jailbreak for iOS 5.
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Developer Tomcat Settings for Sailpoint IIQ Sandboxing

October 10th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted in IAM Development, IAM Engagement

Working on IAM projects and out on client sites for Qubera Solutions, our technical peeps all have developer sandboxes we use for prototyping, setting up read-only connectors to outlying systems (eg. PeopleSoft, AD, LDAP, JDBC connections, etc.), doing RBAC analysis and just about anything GRC related. We sandbox just about everything we can or run pre-configured VMware VMs on laptops outfitted with as much memory as we can. (My Macbook Pro is spiked out at 8gb RAM.)

Generally we use Tomcat for the app server piece but not always. None of this is earth-shattering news. Any developer or integrator of note at Any Company USA and around the world is going to have at least “A” sandbox running if not multiple. Just whether those sandboxes are configured and tweeked properly is going to be the only question, really.

As it relates to Sailpoint IIQ, first of all, me running a Macbook Pro, it’s technically “not supported.” But the IIQ deployment, like Oracle Waveset, is just a WAR. For the middleware piece (the DB layer aside), you essentially deploy a WAR, import your objects from XML, and you are off and running. Nevertheless, the “non-supported” aspect of a MacBook tended to rear its ugly head and I had frequent hangups in Tomcat until I tweeked a few things. It turns out setting my JAVA_OPTS to the following not only helps, but seems to be recommended from a trusted source. (I don’t have permission to credit here, much as I would like, so just take it for what it’s worth.)

I’ll “split this up” in a syntactically correct way so this doesn’t extend the page on the blog entry, but you can put these settings all on one line; hopefully that is obvious:

JAVA_OPTS="-server -Xms3072m -Xmx3072m -XX:NewSize=1024m -XX:MaxNewSize=1024m"
JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -XX:MaxPermSize=1024m -XX:CodeCacheMinimumFreeSpace=2M"
JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -XX:ReservedCodeCacheSize=64M"
JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -Dsun.lang.ClassLoader.allowArraySyntax=true"

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Remote Windows (SMB) Sharing over Secure, Encrypted SSH

October 10th, 2011 | No Comments | Posted in Networking, Security

Here’s a blast from the past. For years I’ve kept an engineering notebook. Simply because after about a decade of playmaking, everything started to blur. Who, what, how and when started to just get hard to track. (And I still haven’t written down everything unfortunately — which really is just a tad irritating when I have to reclimb a mountain once already conquered… :-))

So from time to time, I may reach back and post something of interest, esp. if I’ve had a hard time finding the solution anywhere else. (There’s a million things I’ve done that everyone else has done. You don’t need this blog for that. Click here to find those. :-))

So, once upon a time — I’ll not state the time, place or occasion — I wanted to connect to my Windows shares at home from a remote location inside of a firewall. Now, everyone knows SMB and Windows file sharing in general is notoriously unsecure. How to do this without exposing myself and the network I was on? Enter the old trusty companion, SSH. Here’s how we do it, picking up from a post several years ago:

Original Posting

It’s not too hard to run a remote LAN connection over an SSH tunnel on Windows.  Assuming the SSH tunneling aspect of this is already in place (via Cygwin, PuTTY or something else), here’s what we need to do:
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Getting Command Line Options in Ruby

Recently, after many, many years of serious coding in full OO Perl (none of this measly “admin scripting” you see in Perl that is called “Perl” — but real OO app level Perl!! ;-)), I decided to take the full dive into the deep end of the pool with Ruby for my scripting tool of choice.

I had been playing around with Ruby for over a decade having latched on to it right after it came out around the 2000 timeframe. I immediately saw it as an elegant and concise language that lived up to its billing; once I wrapped my head around the syntax and approach, I could write fairly good Ruby code in no time flat. It definitely had its advantages over Perl, in my opinion, being fully OO’d, and still retained from Perl what I liked most about it.

However, I needed to get real work done and my collection and apprehension of the Perl world (read “CPAN modules”) was much more extensive. For most of the early 2000’s, I was doing a lot more custom web development and mod_perl development (for Rodan & Fields as well as other smaller clients for TechnologEase) and was much too hooked on the templating benefits of Template::Toolkit, HTML::Template and Text::Template and well… Ruby just fell to the wayside. I had to get work done and I simply put Ruby back on the shelf and admired it from afar. My tribute to Ruby was to hijack elements of Ruby and bring them over to Perl. One of my favorites was a one-liner exported into every Perl script:

sub puts { for (@_) { print "$_\n" } } ## Print to stdout, Ruby-style

I also had built a small, but very concise framework in Perl for TechnologEase applications I developed while freelancing. This was nothing the size of anything like Catalyst or Moose but it did (and still does) the job, miraculously transforming everything instantly into objects that were easy to use and create. (If you know anything about OO Perl, you know that the OO Perl model is a bit… concocted, shall we say?!) And part of this framework, esp. for writing command line DSLs was a TechnologEase::Options class for… getting, parsing and creating custom class instances of command line options. It worked something like this:

my $options = TechnologEase::Options->new(
   sourcePath => 's:',
   destPath   => 'd:',
   testing    => 't',
   verbose    => 'v',
);

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